Layouts – 2019 exhibition

PLEASE NOTE: We endeavour to present all layouts as described here. However, this may not always be possible and we reserve the right to amend and withdraw exhibits when circumstances are unavoidable and beyond our control.

Layouts listed below are as confirmed to date – more to come!

Z scale

Blackrock Colorado

Graham Jones
Built by Father and Son team, Graham and Damien Jones, this totally freelance layout is based loosely on American practices from the 1960’s to the modern day. It depicts a coal mine, an industrial area and features a working drive-in cinema. It is situated on the outskirts of the fictitious town of Blackrock at the edge of the Colorado desert. With a track gauge of 6.5mm and a scale of 1:220, tiny yet powerful motors allow these locomotives to haul long passenger and freight trains.

N scale

Bluebell Cutting

John Cox
Bluebell Cutting is a modern image layout, which features a double track mainline passing over a canal. With this being my first attempt at layout building I wanted to keep things simple, hence the plain tracks on the viewing side, which allow a steady flow of trains from the hidden fiddle yards. Track is Peco code 80 and the baseboards are made from ⅜” plywood and 3″x1″ PSE timber.

Brinklow

Milton Keynes Model Railway Society
Brinklow is the latest 2mm scale layout from MKMRS and depicts part of the Trent Valley line between Rugby and Stafford and features the Oxford canal. The station was previously known as Stretton, but renamed Brinklow and closed completely in the early 1950’s. The period modelled is set in BR days from 1950 – 1965 and appropriate stock can be seen. Though mainly an analogue layout, DCC stock can be accommodated by a change of controllers from Gaugemaster to Lenz.

Clifton and Lowther

Eric Farragher
The model is based on Clifton and Lowther, situated on the West Coast Mainline just south of Penrith, a location where I remember watching trains go by in my youth and this was the reason for building the layout. The model reflects the location as it was in the late 1950’s and 1960’s when steam traction was still active. The trackwork on the scenic section of the layout was built using Finetrax by British Finescale using code 40 rail and a gauge of 9mm, which allows the use of current N gauge rolling stock. The track in the fiddle yard is Peco finescale code 55. The buildings are all scratchbuilt and are based on the originals. The scenery has also been scratchbuilt and is loosely based on the locality. However the road layout has been altered to allow the inclusion of a working road system. The rolling stock is a mixture of ready to run and kit built items which have been weathered and have been made up into trains to represent those running during my chosen period. Please do not hesitate to ask if you have any queries about the model or railways in general otherwise I hope you enjoy watching the trains (and lorries) go by.

Dentdale

Milton Keynes Model Railway Society
Well known on the exhibition circuit and winner of several ‘best in show’ awards, Dentdale is still very popular and will be making appearances in Cornwall, Newcastle Upon Tyne and Scotland during 2019. It is based on the Settle and Carlisle Railway and depicts Dent station, and the Arten Gill and Dent Head viaducts. As a commemoration to all those who lost their lives during construction of the real railway across these bleak moors, St.Leonards Church at Chapel Dale has been incorporated into the layout, albeit moved closer to the railway to permit this.

Lacey Dale

The Model Railway Club
Lacey Dale is a two-level layout inspired by Monsal Dale, a winding limestone valley located to the south-east of Buxton in Derbyshire. The high level represents the mainline between Derby and Manchester with the lower level portraying a rural terminus station and goods yard. The layout is set in the years either side of 1960. Peco code 55 track is used and the layout is controlled using NCE Powercab systems.

Pine Valley

Bill & Peter Ball, MKMRS
This layout has been constructed to show what can be achieved at low cost and simple construction methods. It is based on Canadian and American railroad practice, but being purely for personal pleasure, expect to see ‘anything and everything’ including the occasional British train.

Ripponden

David Ramsden
Ripponden is a mill town set in West Yorkshire. The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway proposed a line up the Ryburn valley in 1869 after the first plan was abandoned in 1864; it terminated at Slitheroe but the station was called Rishworth. It was planned to extend the line into Lancashire by tunnelling under Blackstone Edge to Littleborough, hence the double track. Due to the landscape they ran out of money blasting the hillside up to Rishworth. The line opened in 1878 with 8 passenger workings each day. Freight traffic was mainly coal and wool with some agricultural stores and textiles from the mill. Passenger services ended in 1929 and freight in 1953. Constructed in a year, the layout depicts what might have been had the line remained open until the ‘Beeching’ era, consequently by the mid 60’s it is looking tired. Trackwork is code 40 and the buildings, signals and single slip are all scratchbuilt. Stock is a mixture of kit and RTR and the trees are mainly handbuilt.

Roxby Town

Geoff Buttler
The old town of Roxby has been ravaged by modernisation and lost much local industry. Track rationalisation has left Roxby Town a station boasting six platforms serving both local and cross-country services. The lower area caters for stabling, servicing and refuelling of locomotives allocated to Roxby Green Lane Depot but the old goods sheds adjacent to the station have been demolished to make way for a Network Rail yard. Trackwork is Peco streamline with live-frog points operated by stud and probe.

Schwungischerplatz

Marc Fuller
Inspired by the River Spree at the Jannowizbrücke in Berlin, this imaginary city station located somewhere in Germany is served by Regional-Bahn services with occasional Intercity departures. A wide variety of cargo traffic can be seen, some hauled by locomotives from Austria and Switzerland. The layout, presented by the Ickenham & District Society of Model Engineers, uses conventional DC control on Peco track with stock from Arnold, Fleischmann, Minitrix and Roco.

Small N Working

Ian Redman
This is an exercise in minimalism even by N-gauge standards. A light hearted display of working N-gauge trains in what might seem impossibly small spaces. The cry or moan “I don’t have room for a layout” should not be heard anymore.

Westbrook

Paul Butler
Set between the late 80’s and early 90’s sectorisation period, Westbrook is on a busy cross route in the Midlands. It is served by local and long distance passenger services with a connecting branch line terminating in one of the bay platforms. A wide variety of freight traffic passes through the area as well as serving local sites. A rail served terminal stands on part of the old goods yard site receiving regular trip workings. Light locos can often be seen between duties stabled in the station area.

Wickwar

Farnham and Distict MRC
Wickwar is a small town on the secondary main line between Bristol and Goucester, modelled as it was in the early 1950’s. All the buildings are scratchbuilt, and include the Brunel designed station, unique due to the narrow site. The large brewery was built by the railway company to replace several smaller ones whose water supplies had been severed by the construction of the railway tunnel. Open plan baseboards have been used to permit the scale 30 metre height difference between highest and lowest points of the area to be modelled using styrofoam. The photographic backscene depicts the actual location. The layout can be operated in either DC or DCC mode with MERG units controlling all train, signal and point movements. Moving road vehicles use the Faller system – look out for the lady at the bus stop who raises her arm to stop the bus. Watch as dusk falls across the layout when trains have illuminated carriages and the bus runs with its headlights on.

2mm finescale

Llangerisech

Nigel Ashton
Llangerisech is set on the North West coast of Wales on the Lleyn Peninsular, supposedly part of the former Cambrian system. A railway was proposed to the location, but never built in reality. The layout is built to 2FS standards with hand-built track and uses scratch-built structures from actual locations around the Cambrian area. Most locomotives have scratch-built chassis and while some use bodies from N gauge models, others use hand-built bodies too. Details of some of the construction methods are displayed on the layout. In addition to the 1930’s period on display, we can run the layout in early 1960’s and late 1970’s by changing the stock and various scenic features. Although the layout is all built by one person, the friendly members of the 2mm Scale Association Wealden Area Group are essential in running the layout at exhibitions.

TT scale

Naples Street

Rod Shaw
This industrial park straddling Naples Street features a small group of industries served by a variety of freight cars and two small diesel switchers. On cold days, workers from a general goods distributor, Napoli Distribution, like to keep warm by gathering round a glowing brazier in the yard. A chimney at the Can-Freeze Food Company can be made to smoke by pressing a button on the front of the layout – come and have a go! American outline in TT-gauge is unusual even in the USA so suitable products can be hard to obtain. The DCC fitted switchers are from Czech company MTB and the gondola and road vehicles are 3D printed. Track is Peco 12mm with live frog points operated by under baseboard pushrods. Control is by a Roco Multimaus system.

H0 16.5 scale

San Maria Grandia

Ian Milroy
San Maria Gandia is a fictitious Spanish narrow gauge line set in a rural part of Valencian Community around 1967 in the shadow of a RENFE branchline, interwoven with a (working) provincial road. Inspired by various lines around Spain, the layout uses analogue control and the Faller road system. Features include open steam-hauled road running, level crossing with rolling barriers and an unusual shared rail/road single-bore tunnel. The principal freight remains coal from Gandia Port to the power station in San Maria, but the determined little line is losing other traffic to improving road services, and seem liable to follow the local mine into closure.

H0e scale

Hinterupfingen

Neil Forkings
Hinterupfingen is a fictitious holiday destination on the German borders served by a narrow gauge railway. It is mostly used by tourists who come to enjoy the unique wildlife and scenery, although some goods are carried to service this remote community.

H0 scale

59th & Rust

Ray O’Neill
The layout is set between the mid 1950’s and the 1970’s. It depicts a rundown urban branch line, typical of many American cities, with overgrown trackwork, rundown buildings and cluttered with old tyres, oil drums, cardboard boxes and even the odd car. The name for the layout came from the Queens area of New York, where Rust Street crosses the LIRR at Maspeth and meets 59th Drive. 59th and Rust is now the end of the branch which originally carried on for another couple of miles but now terminates a few hundred yards past the Three Crown warehouse. A small spur goes back across Rust St. to serve industrial premises; AG Concrete, which receives sand and cement in covered hoppers, and R & K Boilers who make industrial sized boilers, shipped out by rail. Other industries mainlyh ship or receive goods in 40 or 50 foot box cars with the occasional flatcar. Buildings are scratchbuilt from card and brick paper and suitably weathered. Peco track is used throughout and DCC control is by the Lenz 100 system. All diesel locomotives have sound and typical city sounds play in the background.

Dettingen

Roger Epps
Set in the Black Forest area of southern Germany in the mid 1970’s, Dettingen is a junction on a single line secondary route with a rural branch line joining at the station. Agriculture and forest products dominate the local economy and the agricultural supplies company situated next to the station is the largest business in the area. A small goods yard is located on the far side of the station which handles outgoing farm produce and incoming general goods. Railbuses handle passenger traffic on the branchline while railcars and secondary fast trains run on the mainline. Most mainline traction is now diesel although the occasional stream locomotive can be seen as the end of steam is still some three years away. The layout is DCC, operated by the Roco Z21 system. Track is Peco code 100 with both Peco and Seep point motors. Buildings are kitbuilt from the Faller and Kibri ranges. Signals are from Viessmann, with scenic items from Auhagen, Busch, Noch and Woodland Scenics.

00 scale

Abbey Park

John Polley
WE REGRET THAT ABBEY PARK HAS HAD TO WITHDRAW FROM THE EXHIBITION DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES
Abbey Park is effectively two layouts in one, with upper and lower tracks completely separate and independently operated. The station building is based on Arnos Grove, designed by Charles Holden in the 1930’s art deco style. A variety of trains are run, both tube and surface stock together with heritage and engineering trains, mainly hand built from Metromodels kits. Modified EFE and Harrow Model Shop models are also to be seen. Listen out for prototypical platform announcements and motor air “swoosh” sounds and look out for the electrical flashes as trains pass over track current gaps.

Ashdan Junction

Barry Platt
Ashdan Junction is a fictional location, based on the Cheltenham – Worcester line and the period modelled is the Indian Summer of 1976, and the final months of Class 52 Western diesel traction. Ashdan Town station is a trainspotter’s paradise with classes 20, 24, 25, 31, 37, 40, 47 and 52 all to be seen on various train formations. Local passenger trains are handled by class 121 and 122 units. Look out for the Southern Region based class 33 on the Dagenham – Halewood car train carrying the newly released Ford Fiesta and the Old Oak Common to Swindon Works scrap train with a class 47 hauling 3 withdrawn class 52’s on their final journey to the cutter’s torch. The newly introduced Intercity 125 High Speed Train can be seen passing through, together with Romanian built class 56 on MGR coal trains. To the north end of Ashdan Town station is RAF Oxleywood, the base for a squadron of Vulcan Bombers and the noise of aircraft frequently drown the sounds of the trains.

Axmouth

Steven Saxby
Axmouth is the result of a holiday in Devon and research into the network of ex-LSWR/SR lines in the east of the County, which together with the purchase of a Hornby SR liveried M7 meant a layout was required to run it on. Located beside the River Axe estuary, the terminus at Seaton, with its main and bay platforms, engine shed and goods yard offered good operating potential. Rather than just copy Seaton, a mirror image of the trackplan was drawn up, and placed on the opposite bank of the River Axe, leading to its name Axmouth. A third rail has been laid into the bay platform, being part of an SR test into rural electrification, which had the War not intervened, could have seen more widespread use of EMU’s in the south of England.

Caradon Junction

Mike Kelly
The model is based on but not an exact copy of Coombe Junction on the Liskeard to Looe branch in Cornwall. Trains descend a 1 in 40 incline to the junction where passenger trains run into a dedicated platform. They then reverse back through the junction taking the branch line down to Looe. Freight trains, which due to the incline are quite short and mainly the distinctive china clay hoods, proceed on a separate track under the bridge to the clay dries at Moorswater. The dries are generic rather than an exact replica and in reality the dries are much further away than on the model. The time modelled is from the mid 70’s to early 80’s when blue diesels reigned supreme and classes 25, 37 and 52 can be seen on freights with passenger trains operated by class 121 ‘bubble cars’. The layout is DCC controlled and all locomotives are equipped with sound. Most of the buildings have been scratchbuilt.

Fenny Stratford

David Court & Peter Ellis, MKMRS
This end-to-end layout is an accurate representation of Fenny Stratford station on the Bletchley – Bedford line in the 1950’s when it was twin-tracked all the way to Bedford. The section modelled is from Stag Bridge, which carries the former A5 Trunk Road to where the railway crosses the Grand Union Canal. A busy goods yard serving Rowlands Timber Company and a small coal business, together with a livestock loading dock are also featured. Stock is all ex-LMS and LNER as protoypical for the period. Control is DCC using the NCE Powercab system with Kindle Fire handheld units controlling locomotives and route setting via the JMRI wireless application. Slow action point motors with micro servos control turnouts, signals and the level crossing gates using the JMRI Panel Pro software in lieu of a conventional control panel.

Foster Road

Daniel Deathe
This layout depicts an urban branch terminus somewhere on the London Northwestern system of today’s railways, served by diesel multiple units. There is also a diesel stabling depot. Trackwork is Peco code 75 finescale and the layout is digitally operated using the Hornby Railmaster system via a touchscreen laptop computer, which controls loco movements and sounds.

Frampton on Severn

Dave Fryer
Frampton on Severn is a branch line terminus in rural Gloucestershire, midway between Bristol and Birmingham, built originally by the GWR to serve a small town, the local agricultural community and a busy dairy. Running rights were also extended to the Midland Railway. The layout is set in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s as steam locos were beginning to be replaced by diesels and the passenger and freight traffic were in decline. The dairy was still a rail user and goods trains still supported the local farming community and carried significant parcels traffic. Operated by a Digitrax DCC system, trackwork is Peco Code 75 with turnouts powered by Cobalt point motors. Locomotives and diesel units reflect the ex-GWR and Midland examples to be found still working at the time and all are fitted with sound and come from the Bachmann, Hornby and Dapol ranges.

Great Minion Railway

Trevor Powell
Stand and watch the Minions take time out in Minionwood where they run trains up to Minion Mountain to the lakeside and much more. Look out for the zip line feature and the slideshow on an integrated electronic photoframe.

EM scale

Milton Quays

Milton Keynes Model Railway Society
Milton Quays is set on the Southern Region of British Railways towards the end of the 1950s. Its location is based on an ex LSWR portion of BR(S) on the south coast, broadly somewhere between Southampton and Weymouth. Buildings on the layout are either scratch built or modified kits depicting typical structures from other parts of the LSWR system. The layout is set in a quayside location at the end of a double track branchline from a junction station further inland. The station itself has only transfer goods sidings for the quayside, as it is assumed that the junction station handles the town’s general goods traffic. There are loco servicing facilities where visiting locos can be seen from various inter-regional trains that visit the station bringing goods and passengers for the cross-channel boat services which use the quay. Stock consists of a mixture of converted ready-to-run and kit-built locos and rolling stock which we hope conveys the type of traffic which might have used the station. We mainly use Alex Jackson couplings on freight stock and on the end of coach rakes. Permanent way is built from C&L components for the mainline track and turnouts. Copperclad track is used in the fiddle yard and on the quayside where it has an added checkrail throughout and was then buried in plaster. More recently a third rail has been added into platform five to accommodate electric traction. The layout is operated by analogue control and is the oldest MKMRS layout, dating from the early 1990’s and was the club’s first venture into EM scale.

Trewithick

Graeme Vickery
Trewithick represents an imaginary GWR branchline terminus located in the china clay area of Cornwall. Inspiration for the layout came from family holidays in the 1980’s exploring both the Newquay branch and lines that carried china clay to the mainline at Par and on to the sea port of Fowey. The layout is set in the final years of GWR operation when 45xx and pannier tanks dominated the scene, although there are occasional appearances of diesel hydraulics. Passenger services are catered for by an autocoach or occasional B-set and regular pick-up freight trains serve the yard. China clay trains use the run-round facilities at the station before making the return trip to Fowey. EM gauge SMP flexitrack is used with scratch-built pointwork, signals incorporate a bounce mechanism and buildings are mainly from kits. Locos are converted r-t-r and rolling stock is largely from kits.

0 scale

Arcadia Pennslvania Terminal

David George
Arcadia Pennsylvania is a freelance box-theatre style layout depicting a small industrial railroad freight terminal set in Arcadia, Pennsylvania, Eastern USA. The Arcadia Steelworks blast furnace forms part of the backdrop to the layout, although is not operationally related. Rolling stock and architecture represents the period 1960’s to 1970’s and a short line (APT) serves the location to handle box cars, flat wagons, gondolas and tank cars for several local operations. Sometimes the route is worked by other motive power and, as a result, stock can be seen to be worked by a Pennsylvania RR Alco RS-1, a Louisville & Nashville EMD SDP35. The freight yard’s resident locomotive is a leased Central Railroad of New Jersey EMD SW9 (to be branded APT). Freight traffic is generated using a 4-track traverser that is linked via a short tunnel into the freight servicing area. Points are controlled remotely, using Tortoise slow-action motors. Motive power is provided by three Atlas DCC sound equipped locomotives, controlled by an expanded NCE Power Cab system, with a Lenz backup system.

Asenby St. Peter

Peter Simmerson
Inspired by Tollesbury in Essex, but with an additional siding, this fictitious branch line terminus is operated with ex-Great Eastern locos and stock. Apart from the station, all other buildings are freelance and hopefully capture the essence of 1930’s rural East Anglia. The line passes between Bridge Farm and Bridge Cottage and crosses a timber trestle before reaching the junction to Rainton D’Arcy.

Avon Bridge

Solihull Model Railway Club
The layout is based on the LMS (LMR) station at Northfield, Birmingham. A variety of trains are operated to reflect both passenger and freight workings with both steam and diesel traction. If you enjoy just watching trains go by then this layout should suit you.

Dock Green Loco

Colin French, MKMRS
This is a minimum space layout based on an imaginary industrial locomotive depot somewhere in a fictional docklands area of the United Kingdom in the 1950’s. The backscene represents dockland warehouses and the end scene is an engine shed, permanently closed due to war-time bomb damage. All services at the depot provide adequate facilities for the Dock Company locomotives and occasional visiting mainline shunting locos, both steam and diesel. Dock Lane overbridge provides the scenic break at the other end of the layout. Trackwork consists of three parallel lines, two being the loco depot and the third a hidden siding. To save space there are no turn-outs on the layout – hence its title, instead a short traverser is used in the fiddle yard for locos to change tracks. Watch out for PC Dixon who is continuing with his enquiries.

Warren Hill

Terry Cooke
Warren Hill depicts a small ex-Eastern Counties Railway station under British Railways auspices between 1948 and 1962. It appears to be the end of the line but in fact trains are reversed here to continue on to the end of the branch. Over time the station became more important than the actual terminus. Extra goods traffic for the large agricultural engineering works being served by the goods yard and an off-scene private siding. The colour scheme of the railway buildings is that of the LNER which became part of BR in 1948. There are still buildings displaying this colour scheme today over 60 years later. There is also evidence of the years when Warren Hill was part of the Great Eastern Railway, most of the steam locomotives originating from that company. The majority of the buildings and rolling stock are kit or scratchbuilt and the layout is DCC controlled.

Kensington Addison Road

Twickenham & District MRC
Addison Road, now known as Kensington Olympia, is situated on the West London route between Willesden and Clapham Junction. Modelled as it was around 1925, this former joint line was served by the LNWR, GWR, LBSCR and LSWR companies and stock appears in both pre and post Grouping liveries. Facing the layout you have the Olympia exhibition halls behind you, with Willesden Junction to the left and trains disappear under Kensington High Street bridge towards Clapham Junction to the right. Most trains at this period carried freight but there was an intensive passenger service between Willesden and Earls Court featuring ex-LNWR 3-car electric sets. Look out for the ‘Sunny South Special’ a through train which linked Liverpool and Manchester with Brighton and Eastbourne. Locos were changed at Willesden and an ex-LBSCR loco can be seen hauling the distinctive D213 carriages still in LNWR livery. These carriages were built by Club members. The layout features hand-built LNWR pattern signals. The platform canopy and signal box were made from laser cut plywood from the Club’s own drawings and the trackwork is handbuilt and features both 3rd and 4th rail electrification. The layout is operated by the MERG CBUS system, avoiding the need for section switches.

0 Scale Seven - Finescale

Aston Rowant

Eric Hines
Aston Rowant was a small station on the GWR Watlington Branch from Princes Risborough. It was well used in the war years and later carried wood for furniture making, pit props and farm produce from the surrounding countryside as well as serving the Aston Stud Farm. The track is hand-built to Scale Seven standards.

G scale

Hampton End

Dale Gillard
Hampton End is a small village served by a branch line, which used to bring fish from the nearby quayside. Following its closure many years ago a group of local rail enthusiasts reinstated the track and buildings and purchased a few foreign engines and stock. Leaving the main line we travel along a single track, passing the local rock climbing team enjoying themselves on the rock faces and a gardener working on his allotment behind the engine shed at Hampton Halt. Here the workers are busy getting coal ready for the next steam locomotive. Track work is by Trainline 45, supplied by Glendale Junction, together with the rock climbing figures. Buildings come from the T&M range, with trees and allotment vegetables by Ceynix Trees.

G1 scale

Penphyl Halt

Martin Shenton, MKMRS
Penphyl Halt is an indoor G scale ‘garden’ railway. It features trains, buildings and accessories which are also used on my outdoor garden railway at home. A variety of trains can be seen running on the twin running lines. Models include LGB German outline, Lynton & Barnstaple trains and White Pass models from the USA, together with the odd quirky extra in between.

3 scale

Warton Road

Warton Road Preservation Group
Warton Road is a small terminus station modelled to Gauge 3 standards, being to a scale of 1:22.5 with a track gauge of 2.5 inches, a scale well suited to the garden. The railway is run by a preservation group which has taken over a fictional branch axed during the ‘Beeching’ cuts. The society operates a true community railway with frequent steam trains for tourists utilising a range of GWR, BR and SR locomotives supplemented by regular first generation DMU stock for the off peak passenger services. This gives a good variety of train formations and stock, much of which is displayed on the layout rather than stored off-scene. All models are battery powered radio controlled and many have sound fitted. The layout has been constructed on a modular basis which gives scope to vary what is displayed to suit the space available.

FULL LIST OF ALL LAYOUTS TO DATE

Z scale

Blackrock Colorado

Graham Jones
Built by Father and Son team, Graham and Damien Jones, this totally freelance layout is based loosely on American practices from the 1960’s to the modern day. It depicts a coal mine, an industrial area and features a working drive-in cinema. It is situated on the outskirts of the fictitious town of Blackrock at the edge of the Colorado desert. With a track gauge of 6.5mm and a scale of 1:220, tiny yet powerful motors allow these locomotives to haul long passenger and freight trains.

N scale

Bluebell Cutting

John Cox
Bluebell Cutting is a modern image layout, which features a double track mainline passing over a canal. With this being my first attempt at layout building I wanted to keep things simple, hence the plain tracks on the viewing side, which allow a steady flow of trains from the hidden fiddle yards. Track is Peco code 80 and the baseboards are made from ⅜” plywood and 3″x1″ PSE timber.

Brinklow

Milton Keynes Model Railway Society
Brinklow is the latest 2mm scale layout from MKMRS and depicts part of the Trent Valley line between Rugby and Stafford and features the Oxford canal. The station was previously known as Stretton, but renamed Brinklow and closed completely in the early 1950’s. The period modelled is set in BR days from 1950 – 1965 and appropriate stock can be seen. Though mainly an analogue layout, DCC stock can be accommodated by a change of controllers from Gaugemaster to Lenz.

Clifton and Lowther

Eric Farragher
The model is based on Clifton and Lowther, situated on the West Coast Mainline just south of Penrith, a location where I remember watching trains go by in my youth and this was the reason for building the layout. The model reflects the location as it was in the late 1950’s and 1960’s when steam traction was still active. The trackwork on the scenic section of the layout was built using Finetrax by British Finescale using code 40 rail and a gauge of 9mm, which allows the use of current N gauge rolling stock. The track in the fiddle yard is Peco finescale code 55. The buildings are all scratchbuilt and are based on the originals. The scenery has also been scratchbuilt and is loosely based on the locality. However the road layout has been altered to allow the inclusion of a working road system. The rolling stock is a mixture of ready to run and kit built items which have been weathered and have been made up into trains to represent those running during my chosen period. Please do not hesitate to ask if you have any queries about the model or railways in general otherwise I hope you enjoy watching the trains (and lorries) go by.

Dentdale

Milton Keynes Model Railway Society
Well known on the exhibition circuit and winner of several ‘best in show’ awards, Dentdale is still very popular and will be making appearances in Cornwall, Newcastle Upon Tyne and Scotland during 2019. It is based on the Settle and Carlisle Railway and depicts Dent station, and the Arten Gill and Dent Head viaducts. As a commemoration to all those who lost their lives during construction of the real railway across these bleak moors, St.Leonards Church at Chapel Dale has been incorporated into the layout, albeit moved closer to the railway to permit this.

Lacey Dale

The Model Railway Club
Lacey Dale is a two-level layout inspired by Monsal Dale, a winding limestone valley located to the south-east of Buxton in Derbyshire. The high level represents the mainline between Derby and Manchester with the lower level portraying a rural terminus station and goods yard. The layout is set in the years either side of 1960. Peco code 55 track is used and the layout is controlled using NCE Powercab systems.

Pine Valley

Bill & Peter Ball, MKMRS
This layout has been constructed to show what can be achieved at low cost and simple construction methods. It is based on Canadian and American railroad practice, but being purely for personal pleasure, expect to see ‘anything and everything’ including the occasional British train.

Ripponden

David Ramsden
Ripponden is a mill town set in West Yorkshire. The Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway proposed a line up the Ryburn valley in 1869 after the first plan was abandoned in 1864; it terminated at Slitheroe but the station was called Rishworth. It was planned to extend the line into Lancashire by tunnelling under Blackstone Edge to Littleborough, hence the double track. Due to the landscape they ran out of money blasting the hillside up to Rishworth. The line opened in 1878 with 8 passenger workings each day. Freight traffic was mainly coal and wool with some agricultural stores and textiles from the mill. Passenger services ended in 1929 and freight in 1953. Constructed in a year, the layout depicts what might have been had the line remained open until the ‘Beeching’ era, consequently by the mid 60’s it is looking tired. Trackwork is code 40 and the buildings, signals and single slip are all scratchbuilt. Stock is a mixture of kit and RTR and the trees are mainly handbuilt.

Roxby Town

Geoff Buttler
The old town of Roxby has been ravaged by modernisation and lost much local industry. Track rationalisation has left Roxby Town a station boasting six platforms serving both local and cross-country services. The lower area caters for stabling, servicing and refuelling of locomotives allocated to Roxby Green Lane Depot but the old goods sheds adjacent to the station have been demolished to make way for a Network Rail yard. Trackwork is Peco streamline with live-frog points operated by stud and probe.

Schwungischerplatz

Marc Fuller
Inspired by the River Spree at the Jannowizbrücke in Berlin, this imaginary city station located somewhere in Germany is served by Regional-Bahn services with occasional Intercity departures. A wide variety of cargo traffic can be seen, some hauled by locomotives from Austria and Switzerland. The layout, presented by the Ickenham & District Society of Model Engineers, uses conventional DC control on Peco track with stock from Arnold, Fleischmann, Minitrix and Roco.

Small N Working

Ian Redman
This is an exercise in minimalism even by N-gauge standards. A light hearted display of working N-gauge trains in what might seem impossibly small spaces. The cry or moan “I don’t have room for a layout” should not be heard anymore.

Westbrook

Paul Butler
Set between the late 80’s and early 90’s sectorisation period, Westbrook is on a busy cross route in the Midlands. It is served by local and long distance passenger services with a connecting branch line terminating in one of the bay platforms. A wide variety of freight traffic passes through the area as well as serving local sites. A rail served terminal stands on part of the old goods yard site receiving regular trip workings. Light locos can often be seen between duties stabled in the station area.

Wickwar

Farnham and Distict MRC
Wickwar is a small town on the secondary main line between Bristol and Goucester, modelled as it was in the early 1950’s. All the buildings are scratchbuilt, and include the Brunel designed station, unique due to the narrow site. The large brewery was built by the railway company to replace several smaller ones whose water supplies had been severed by the construction of the railway tunnel. Open plan baseboards have been used to permit the scale 30 metre height difference between highest and lowest points of the area to be modelled using styrofoam. The photographic backscene depicts the actual location. The layout can be operated in either DC or DCC mode with MERG units controlling all train, signal and point movements. Moving road vehicles use the Faller system – look out for the lady at the bus stop who raises her arm to stop the bus. Watch as dusk falls across the layout when trains have illuminated carriages and the bus runs with its headlights on.l and long distance passenger services with a connecting branch line terminating in one of the bay platforms. A wide variety of freight traffic passes through the area as well as serving local sites. A rail served terminal stands on part of the old goods yard site receiving regular trip workings. Light locos can often be seen between duties stabled in the station area.

2mm finescale

Llangerisech

Nigel Ashton
Llangerisech is set on the North West coast of Wales on the Lleyn Peninsular, supposedly part of the former Cambrian system. A railway was proposed to the location, but never built in reality. The layout is built to 2FS standards with hand-built track and uses scratch-built structures from actual locations around the Cambrian area. Most locomotives have scratch-built chassis and while some use bodies from N gauge models, others use hand-built bodies too. Details of some of the construction methods are displayed on the layout. In addition to the 1930’s period on display, we can run the layout in early 1960’s and late 1970’s by changing the stock and various scenic features. Although the layout is all built by one person, the friendly members of the 2mm Scale Association Wealden Area Group are essential in running the layout at exhibitions.

TT scale

Naples Street

Rod Shaw
This industrial park straddling Naples Street features a small group of industries served by a variety of freight cars and two small diesel switchers. On cold days, workers from a general goods distributor, Napoli Distribution, like to keep warm by gathering round a glowing brazier in the yard. A chimney at the Can-Freeze Food Company can be made to smoke by pressing a button on the front of the layout – come and have a go! American outline in TT-gauge is unusual even in the USA so suitable products can be hard to obtain. The DCC fitted switchers are from Czech company MTB and the gondola and road vehicles are 3D printed. Track is Peco 12mm with live frog points operated by under baseboard pushrods. Control is by a Roco Multimaus system.

H0 16.5 scale

San Maria Grandia

Ian Milroy
San Maria Gandia is a fictitious Spanish narrow gauge line set in a rural part of Valencian Community around 1967 in the shadow of a RENFE branchline, interwoven with a (working) provincial road. Inspired by various lines around Spain, the layout uses analogue control and the Faller road system. Features include open steam-hauled road running, level crossing with rolling barriers and an unusual shared rail/road single-bore tunnel. The principal freight remains coal from Gandia Port to the power station in San Maria, but the determined little line is losing other traffic to improving road services, and seem liable to follow the local mine into closure.

H0e scale

Hinterupfingen

Neil Forkings
Hinterupfingen is a fictitious holiday destination on the German borders served by a narrow gauge railway. It is mostly used by tourists who come to enjoy the unique wildlife and scenery, although some goods are carried to service this remote community.

H0 scale

59th & Rust

Ray O’Neill
The layout is set between the mid 1950’s and the 1970’s. It depicts a rundown urban branch line, typical of many American cities, with overgrown trackwork, rundown buildings and cluttered with old tyres, oil drums, cardboard boxes and even the odd car. The name for the layout came from the Queens area of New York, where Rust Street crosses the LIRR at Maspeth and meets 59th Drive. 59th and Rust is now the end of the branch which originally carried on for another couple of miles but now terminates a few hundred yards past the Three Crown warehouse. A small spur goes back across Rust St. to serve industrial premises; AG Concrete, which receives sand and cement in covered hoppers, and R & K Boilers who make industrial sized boilers, shipped out by rail. Other industries mainlyh ship or receive goods in 40 or 50 foot box cars with the occasional flatcar. Buildings are scratchbuilt from card and brick paper and suitably weathered. Peco track is used throughout and DCC control is by the Lenz 100 system. All diesel locomotives have sound and typical city sounds play in the background.

Dettingen

Roger Epps
Set in the Black Forest area of southern Germany in the mid 1970’s, Dettingen is a junction on a single line secondary route with a rural branch line joining at the station. Agriculture and forest products dominate the local economy and the agricultural supplies company situated next to the station is the largest business in the area. A small goods yard is located on the far side of the station which handles outgoing farm produce and incoming general goods. Railbuses handle passenger traffic on the branchline while railcars and secondary fast trains run on the mainline. Most mainline traction is now diesel although the occasional stream locomotive can be seen as the end of steam is still some three years away. The layout is DCC, operated by the Roco Z21 system. Track is Peco code 100 with both Peco and Seep point motors. Buildings are kitbuilt from the Faller and Kibri ranges. Signals are from Viessmann, with scenic items from Auhagen, Busch, Noch and Woodland Scenics.

00 scale

Abbey Park

John Polley
WE REGRET THAT ABBEY PARK HAS HAD TO WITHDRAW FROM THE EXHIBITION DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES
Abbey Park is effectively two layouts in one, with upper and lower tracks completely separate and independently operated. The station building is based on Arnos Grove, designed by Charles Holden in the 1930’s art deco style. A variety of trains are run, both tube and surface stock together with heritage and engineering trains, mainly hand built from Metromodels kits. Modified EFE and Harrow Model Shop models are also to be seen. Listen out for prototypical platform announcements and motor air “swoosh” sounds and look out for the electrical flashes as trains pass over track current gaps.

Ashdan Junction

Barry Platt
Ashdan Junction is a fictional location, based on the Cheltenham – Worcester line and the period modelled is the Indian Summer of 1976, and the final months of Class 52 Western diesel traction. Ashdan Town station is a trainspotter’s paradise with classes 20, 24, 25, 31, 37, 40, 47 and 52 all to be seen on various train formations. Local passenger trains are handled by class 121 and 122 units. Look out for the Southern Region based class 33 on the Dagenham – Halewood car train carrying the newly released Ford Fiesta and the Old Oak Common to Swindon Works scrap train with a class 47 hauling 3 withdrawn class 52’s on their final journey to the cutter’s torch. The newly introduced Intercity 125 High Speed Train can be seen passing through, together with Romanian built class 56 on MGR coal trains. To the north end of Ashdan Town station is RAF Oxleywood, the base for a squadron of Vulcan Bombers and the noise of aircraft frequently drown the sounds of the trains.

Axmouth

Steven Saxby
Axmouth is the result of a holiday in Devon and research into the network of ex-LSWR/SR lines in the east of the County, which together with the purchase of a Hornby SR liveried M7 meant a layout was required to run it on. Located beside the River Axe estuary, the terminus at Seaton, with its main and bay platforms, engine shed and goods yard offered good operating potential. Rather than just copy Seaton, a mirror image of the trackplan was drawn up, and placed on the opposite bank of the River Axe, leading to its name Axmouth. A third rail has been laid into the bay platform, being part of an SR test into rural electrification, which had the War not intervened, could have seen more widespread use of EMU’s in the south of England.

Caradon Junction

Mike Kelly
The model is based on but not an exact copy of Coombe Junction on the Liskeard to Looe branch in Cornwall. Trains descend a 1 in 40 incline to the junction where passenger trains run into a dedicated platform. They then reverse back through the junction taking the branch line down to Looe. Freight trains, which due to the incline are quite short and mainly the distinctive china clay hoods, proceed on a separate track under the bridge to the clay dries at Moorswater. The dries are generic rather than an exact replica and in reality the dries are much further away than on the model. The time modelled is from the mid 70’s to early 80’s when blue diesels reigned supreme and classes 25, 37 and 52 can be seen on freights with passenger trains operated by class 121 ‘bubble cars’. The layout is DCC controlled and all locomotives are equipped with sound. Most of the buildings have been scratchbuilt.

Fenny Stratford

David Court & Peter Ellis, MKMRS
This end-to-end layout is an accurate representation of Fenny Stratford station on the Bletchley – Bedford line in the 1950’s when it was twin-tracked all the way to Bedford. The section modelled is from Stag Bridge, which carries the former A5 Trunk Road to where the railway crosses the Grand Union Canal. A busy goods yard serving Rowlands Timber Company and a small coal business, together with a livestock loading dock are also featured. Stock is all ex-LMS and LNER as protoypical for the period. Control is DCC using the NCE Powercab system with Kindle Fire handheld units controlling locomotives and route setting via the JMRI wireless application. Slow action point motors with micro servos control turnouts, signals and the level crossing gates using the JMRI Panel Pro software in lieu of a conventional control panel.

Foster Road

Daniel Deathe
This layout depicts an urban branch terminus somewhere on the London Northwestern system of today’s railways, served by diesel multiple units. There is also a diesel stabling depot. Trackwork is Peco code 75 finescale and the layout is digitally operated using the Hornby Railmaster system via a touchscreen laptop computer, which controls loco movements and sounds.

Frampton on Severn

Dave Fryer
Frampton on Severn is a branch line terminus in rural Gloucestershire, midway between Bristol and Birmingham, built originally by the GWR to serve a small town, the local agricultural community and a busy dairy. Running rights were also extended to the Midland Railway. The layout is set in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s as steam locos were beginning to be replaced by diesels and the passenger and freight traffic were in decline. The dairy was still a rail user and goods trains still supported the local farming community and carried significant parcels traffic. Operated by a Digitrax DCC system, trackwork is Peco Code 75 with turnouts powered by Cobalt point motors. Locomotives and diesel units reflect the ex-GWR and Midland examples to be found still working at the time and all are fitted with sound and come from the Bachmann, Hornby and Dapol ranges.

Great Minion Railway

Trevor Powell
Stand and watch the Minions take time out in Minionwood where they run trains up to Minion Mountain to the lakeside and much more. Look out for the zip line feature and the slideshow on an integrated electronic photoframe.

EM scale

Milton Quays

Milton Keynes Model Railway Society
Milton Quays is set on the Southern Region of British Railways towards the end of the 1950s. Its location is based on an ex LSWR portion of BR(S) on the south coast, broadly somewhere between Southampton and Weymouth. Buildings on the layout are either scratch built or modified kits depicting typical structures from other parts of the LSWR system. The layout is set in a quayside location at the end of a double track branchline from a junction station further inland. The station itself has only transfer goods sidings for the quayside, as it is assumed that the junction station handles the town’s general goods traffic. There are loco servicing facilities where visiting locos can be seen from various inter-regional trains that visit the station bringing goods and passengers for the cross-channel boat services which use the quay. Stock consists of a mixture of converted ready-to-run and kit-built locos and rolling stock which we hope conveys the type of traffic which might have used the station. We mainly use Alex Jackson couplings on freight stock and on the end of coach rakes. Permanent way is built from C&L components for the mainline track and turnouts. Copperclad track is used in the fiddle yard and on the quayside where it has an added checkrail throughout and was then buried in plaster. More recently a third rail has been added into platform five to accommodate electric traction. The layout is operated by analogue control and is the oldest MKMRS layout, dating from the early 1990’s and was the club’s first venture into EM scale.

Trewithick

Graeme Vickery
Trewithick represents an imaginary GWR branchline terminus located in the china clay area of Cornwall. Inspiration for the layout came from family holidays in the 1980’s exploring both the Newquay branch and lines that carried china clay to the mainline at Par and on to the sea port of Fowey. The layout is set in the final years of GWR operation when 45xx and pannier tanks dominated the scene, although there are occasional appearances of diesel hydraulics. Passenger services are catered for by an autocoach or occasional B-set and regular pick-up freight trains serve the yard. China clay trains use the run-round facilities at the station before making the return trip to Fowey. EM gauge SMP flexitrack is used with scratch-built pointwork, signals incorporate a bounce mechanism and buildings are mainly from kits. Locos are converted r-t-r and rolling stock is largely from kits.

0 scale

Arcadia Pennslvania Terminal

David George
Arcadia Pennsylvania is a freelance box-theatre style layout depicting a small industrial railroad freight terminal set in Arcadia, Pennsylvania, Eastern USA. The Arcadia Steelworks blast furnace forms part of the backdrop to the layout, although is not operationally related. Rolling stock and architecture represents the period 1960’s to 1970’s and a short line (APT) serves the location to handle box cars, flat wagons, gondolas and tank cars for several local operations. Sometimes the route is worked by other motive power and, as a result, stock can be seen to be worked by a Pennsylvania RR Alco RS-1, a Louisville & Nashville EMD SDP35. The freight yard’s resident locomotive is a leased Central Railroad of New Jersey EMD SW9 (to be branded APT). Freight traffic is generated using a 4-track traverser that is linked via a short tunnel into the freight servicing area. Points are controlled remotely, using Tortoise slow-action motors. Motive power is provided by three Atlas DCC sound equipped locomotives, controlled by an expanded NCE Power Cab system, with a Lenz backup system.

Asenby St. Peter

Peter Simmerson
Inspired by Tollesbury in Essex, but with an additional siding, this fictitious branch line terminus is operated with ex-Great Eastern locos and stock. Apart from the station, all other buildings are freelance and hopefully capture the essence of 1930’s rural East Anglia. The line passes between Bridge Farm and Bridge Cottage and crosses a timber trestle before reaching the junction to Rainton D’Arcy.

Avon Bridge

Solihull Model Railway Club
The layout is based on the LMS (LMR) station at Northfield, Birmingham. A variety of trains are operated to reflect both passenger and freight workings with both steam and diesel traction. If you enjoy just watching trains go by then this layout should suit you.

Dock Green Loco

Colin French, MKMRS
This is a minimum space layout based on an imaginary industrial locomotive depot somewhere in a fictional docklands area of the United Kingdom in the 1950’s. The backscene represents dockland warehouses and the end scene is an engine shed, permanently closed due to war-time bomb damage. All services at the depot provide adequate facilities for the Dock Company locomotives and occasional visiting mainline shunting locos, both steam and diesel. Dock Lane overbridge provides the scenic break at the other end of the layout. Trackwork consists of three parallel lines, two being the loco depot and the third a hidden siding. To save space there are no turn-outs on the layout – hence its title, instead a short traverser is used in the fiddle yard for locos to change tracks. Watch out for PC Dixon who is continuing with his enquiries.

Warren Hill

Terry Cooke
Warren Hill depicts a small ex-Eastern Counties Railway station under British Railways auspices between 1948 and 1962. It appears to be the end of the line but in fact trains are reversed here to continue on to the end of the branch. Over time the station became more important than the actual terminus. Extra goods traffic for the large agricultural engineering works being served by the goods yard and an off-scene private siding. The colour scheme of the railway buildings is that of the LNER which became part of BR in 1948. There are still buildings displaying this colour scheme today over 60 years later. There is also evidence of the years when Warren Hill was part of the Great Eastern Railway, most of the steam locomotives originating from that company. The majority of the buildings and rolling stock are kit or scratchbuilt and the layout is DCC controlled.

Kensington Addison Road

Twickenham & District MRC
Addison Road, now known as Kensington Olympia, is situated on the West London route between Willesden and Clapham Junction. Modelled as it was around 1925, this former joint line was served by the LNWR, GWR, LBSCR and LSWR companies and stock appears in both pre and post Grouping liveries. Facing the layout you have the Olympia exhibition halls behind you, with Willesden Junction to the left and trains disappear under Kensington High Street bridge towards Clapham Junction to the right. Most trains at this period carried freight but there was an intensive passenger service between Willesden and Earls Court featuring ex-LNWR 3-car electric sets. Look out for the ‘Sunny South Special’ a through train which linked Liverpool and Manchester with Brighton and Eastbourne. Locos were changed at Willesden and an ex-LBSCR loco can be seen hauling the distinctive D213 carriages still in LNWR livery. These carriages were built by Club members. The layout features hand-built LNWR pattern signals. The platform canopy and signal box were made from laser cut plywood from the Club’s own drawings and the trackwork is handbuilt and features both 3rd and 4th rail electrification. The layout is operated by the MERG CBUS system, avoiding the need for section switches.

0 Scale Seven – Finescale

Aston Rowant

Eric Hines
Aston Rowant was a small station on the GWR Watlington Branch from Princes Risborough. It was well used in the war years and later carried wood for furniture making, pit props and farm produce from the surrounding countryside as well as serving the Aston Stud Farm. The track is hand-built to Scale Seven standards.

G scale

Hampton End

Dale Gillard
Hampton End is a small village served by a branch line, which used to bring fish from the nearby quayside. Following its closure many years ago a group of local rail enthusiasts reinstated the track and buildings and purchased a few foreign engines and stock. Leaving the main line we travel along a single track, passing the local rock climbing team enjoying themselves on the rock faces and a gardener working on his allotment behind the engine shed at Hampton Halt. Here the workers are busy getting coal ready for the next steam locomotive. Track work is by Trainline 45, supplied by Glendale Junction, together with the rock climbing figures. Buildings come from the T&M range, with trees and allotment vegetables by Ceynix Trees.

G1 scale

Penphyl Halt

Martin Shenton, MKMRS
Penphyl Halt is an indoor G scale ‘garden’ railway. It features trains, buildings and accessories which are also used on my outdoor garden railway at home. A variety of trains can be seen running on the twin running lines. Models include LGB German outline, Lynton & Barnstaple trains and White Pass models from the USA, together with the odd quirky extra in between.

3 scale

Warton Road

Warton Road Preservation Group
Warton Road is a small terminus station modelled to Gauge 3 standards, being to a scale of 1:22.5 with a track gauge of 2.5 inches, a scale well suited to the garden. The railway is run by a preservation group which has taken over a fictional branch axed during the ‘Beeching’ cuts. The society operates a true community railway with frequent steam trains for tourists utilising a range of GWR, BR and SR locomotives supplemented by regular first generation DMU stock for the off peak passenger services. This gives a good variety of train formations and stock, much of which is displayed on the layout rather than stored off-scene. All models are battery powered radio controlled and many have sound fitted. The layout has been constructed on a modular basis which gives scope to vary what is displayed to suit the space available.

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